September 20, 2017

Reducing Your Mental Clutter

Working toward a life where your mind is clear and focused.

Do you ever have moments where you feel like your mind completely overwhelmed? There is so much information being thrown our way on a daily basis that it’s hard not to feel like we’re losing control. Thankfully there are quick practices and reflection techniques that can limit these moments and allow you to perform and feel at your absolute best.

Anything is possible when you can control your mind but just as it takes work to go through your physical belongings and prioritize what you really need, effort and training is required to take control of your mind effectively. There are many mindful and reflective practices that can help you get started. Meditation, journaling and breathing are just a few simple options that can make a huge impact on your life. Top performers, leaders, entrepreneurs and elite athletes have been focusing on their mental fitness for years. The benefits are real and there is strong supporting scientific evidence, just ask your friend Google!

The key is to slow down and try something that fits within your current routine. Even taking five minutes a day to concentrate on your breath can change your entire day. Or taking a few minutes each Sunday to reflect on the week that just passed can dramatically up your game. Using a simple question is also an effective way to help bring order to your mind.

“What makes me happy?”
“What would make today great?”
“What was my biggest learning this week?”

Small practices like these over time can have such a huge impact in clearing your mind and allowing you to be more focused. Think, fitness for your mind, the more you train the more benefit you will see. Try something that feels right for you, start small and enjoy the benefits. For a look inside the mental practices of one of the founders of Minimalism Life check out our interview with Alberto Negro.

Published by Marc Champagne in Lifestyle

Photography by Christoffer Engström

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